Pod313 Tech Tips - Pod313.com
burglaralarmbritainlite:

Civic Alarms, Oxford, 2012
"Civic Alarms" burglar alarm, Oxford • There’s a similar logo on a "baton" alarm here. 

burglaralarmbritainlite:

Civic Alarms, Oxford, 2012

"Civic Alarms" burglar alarm, Oxford • There’s a similar logo on a "baton" alarm here. 

scotterenaissance:

The Information Geographies project at the Oxford Internet Institute has produced a terrific cartogram, in the style of subway network maps, that combines Greg’s Cable Map of global telecom infrastructure data with the Enemies of the Internet 2014 report from Reporters Without Borders on state surveillance and censorship of national Internet. 
I like thinking about this map and the high-level view it provides of the very physical foundations of the Internet, the bones and blood vessels that get obfuscated by the Cloud, itself made of VPS-stuffed data centers.
This map also helps to ground my thinking about the Internet back down to the crucially pertinent level of international policy. Knowing that the global traffic of data that constitute the Web cross national borders all the time, it hadn’t crossed my mind until recently that which traffic and from where can be and is controlled at the state level. Even though I knew of China’s firewall, it was only a news-headline awareness, having grown up with the Internet and a concordant faith that it is and would forever be global, wild, and open.
It is here that the above map becomes especially pertinent, as the vectors of the Internet and policy have lately intersected in rounds of international tumult. Snowden’s revelations, for one, have some states scratching protectionist ideas; locking out foreign Internet traffic is now a growing sentiment dubbed ‘Internet Balkanization’. Read that linked Wired article from earlier this year, and if it helps, keep the above map, and this helpful piece from Slate, in mind:


The base of the hourglass is the physical layer, the undersea cables and hardware that form the underlying tangible infrastructure of the Internet. The hourglass’s narrow middle is the protocol layer, which constitutes the “ways for data to flow,” with the Internet Protocol, the heart of it, being at the center of the hourglass. Built on top of these protocols is the application layer, the “tasks people might want to perform on the network,” such as Berners-Lee’s development of HTTP and the World Wide Web, an application used by hundreds of millions every day to day. Zittrain also mentions the content layer, where “actual information [is] exchanged among the network’s users,” and the social layer where “new behaviors and interactions among people” take place through the Internet.
To determine whether the Internet is becoming more or less fragmented, the first question is: What piece of the infrastructure, what layer, are we talking about? And what kind of fragmentation?
…
When we’re talking about everything from the Internet’s content to its infrastructure, the stakes are incredibly high. That’s why we need to take the debate to this next level: to move from the alarmist “Balkanization” to a more detailed analysis of fragmentation and diversity.

scotterenaissance:

The Information Geographies project at the Oxford Internet Institute has produced a terrific cartogram, in the style of subway network maps, that combines Greg’s Cable Map of global telecom infrastructure data with the Enemies of the Internet 2014 report from Reporters Without Borders on state surveillance and censorship of national Internet. 

I like thinking about this map and the high-level view it provides of the very physical foundations of the Internet, the bones and blood vessels that get obfuscated by the Cloud, itself made of VPS-stuffed data centers.

This map also helps to ground my thinking about the Internet back down to the crucially pertinent level of international policy. Knowing that the global traffic of data that constitute the Web cross national borders all the time, it hadn’t crossed my mind until recently that which traffic and from where can be and is controlled at the state level. Even though I knew of China’s firewall, it was only a news-headline awareness, having grown up with the Internet and a concordant faith that it is and would forever be global, wild, and open.

It is here that the above map becomes especially pertinent, as the vectors of the Internet and policy have lately intersected in rounds of international tumult. Snowden’s revelations, for one, have some states scratching protectionist ideas; locking out foreign Internet traffic is now a growing sentiment dubbed ‘Internet Balkanization’. Read that linked Wired article from earlier this year, and if it helps, keep the above map, and this helpful piece from Slate, in mind:

The base of the hourglass is the physical layer, the undersea cables and hardware that form the underlying tangible infrastructure of the Internet. The hourglass’s narrow middle is the protocol layer, which constitutes the “ways for data to flow,” with the Internet Protocol, the heart of it, being at the center of the hourglass. Built on top of these protocols is the application layer, the “tasks people might want to perform on the network,” such as Berners-Lee’s development of HTTP and the World Wide Web, an application used by hundreds of millions every day to day. Zittrain also mentions the content layer, where “actual information [is] exchanged among the network’s users,” and the social layer where “new behaviors and interactions among people” take place through the Internet.

To determine whether the Internet is becoming more or less fragmented, the first question is: What piece of the infrastructure, what layer, are we talking about? And what kind of fragmentation?

When we’re talking about everything from the Internet’s content to its infrastructure, the stakes are incredibly high. That’s why we need to take the debate to this next level: to move from the alarmist “Balkanization” to a more detailed analysis of fragmentation and diversity.

sexycameras:

DTR 10414
Detroit Midtown

sexycameras:


DTR 10414

Detroit Midtown

John Twelve Hawks Lifts the Mask (Sort Of)

thatposhgirl:

John Twelve Hawks Lifts the Mask (Sort Of)

Against Authority

Against Authority

Spark, the new novel from John Twelve Hawks comes out on October 7th, 2014. Ahead of its publication, Hawks has released a free eBook called Against Authoritythat urges readers to take more control over the digital lives and public identities. The 94-page essay is a well-researched, well-documented look at the evolution of surveillance and privacy in the 21st century. At the…

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perfectlyflawedxox:

Well then.

perfectlyflawedxox:

Well then.

Dept Of Homeland Security Funding Local Police Depts To Be Able To Spy On YOUR Cell Phones

Surveillance itself may be one reason that social media users are more reticent about offering their opinions on surveillance. This capacity for surveillance to limit politics before it even gets started may be a better reason to oppose its extension in Australia than any vague and contested notions of privacy.
?
? The internet is a cesspit of conflict, right? No – it’s an engine of consensus. Jason Wilson http://gu.com/p/4x4cm (via juhavantzelfde)
The environments we interact in are also shaped by a commercially-motivated imperative that has political effects: the desire to keep us happy. The Facebook research that occasioned recent controversy over research ethics was all part of a larger effort to algorithmically minimise conflict, whose starting point, according to Facebook data scientist Adam Kramer, is that “exposure to friends’ negativity might lead people to avoid visiting Facebook”. With less and less aberrant disagreement inside our “filter bubbles”, perhaps we are losing the knack.
?
? The internet is a cesspit of conflict, right? No – it’s an engine of consensus. Jason Wilson http://gu.com/p/4x4cm (via juhavantzelfde)

thoughtshrapnel:

My talk on ‘Raising the Next Generation’.